Thursday, 23 May 2013

On the Woolwich murder

I am on a blogging break.  But I need an outlet as today I am sickened and I'm worried about what kind of Britain my daughter is going to grow up in.  About the Britain she is growing up in.

The Woolwich murder that is dominating today's news is despicable, abhorrent, tragic.  Of course all thoughts are with that poor young man's family as they struggle to make sense of how this could happen in broad daylight.

Or that's where thoughts should be.

But if the front pages, the commentary on reputable news sites, such as the BBC, and my Facebook news feed is any kind of barometer to where thoughts really lie, then it is not with the victim.

Not really.

My news feed is full of outraged, slavering calls for hangings and retribution.  Of book burnings.  Of defences against Sharia law.  Of BNP soundbites.

Who even mentioned Sharia Law?

The perpetrator of this disgusting crime didn't.  So why do we?  Yet I'm seeing calls to 'kick 'em all out!'

And who are they?  Well they are those who live among us as friends, as fellow Brits.  Those who have a different heritage and a different religion.  Those who are just as sickened by the young soldier's murder as those of us who are white and Christian (well me, I'm actually an atheist).

I have friends with headscarves.  I have had friends with the full face beard favoured by some of those who worship Allah and try to live a good life, as decreed in the Quran.

I have taught fun, peaceful, hardworking Muslim teenagers, some in full traditional Muslim clothing, some who are a little more 'westernised' in their appearance.  Muslim children grateful to have an education, completely respectful that a youngish woman is stood before them attempting to teach them about Business so that they can go into the world, make their fortune, and contribute taxes to British society.

They don't want Sharia Law, they don't want murders in the name of their prophet or their God.

The Islamic Society of Britain have said that 'murdering a British soldier is an attack on our nation'.  And I guess it is if you take the murderer's words at face value.  It's not only an attack on those of us with a long British genealogy who sections of society would deem have the sole right to be here (BNP, EDL, among others) - it is an attack on all of us.  Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Jews, Sikhs, Buddhists, Atheists, Agnostics, even the Jedis....

But the attack, already labelled an act of terror by the Government is to be hijacked it seems, by those who view immigration as one of the scourges of this country.

And so today the outrage is not directed at the individual, but the religion and those who practice it - with no acknowledgement that Jihadism has no place in the genuine faith of Islam.

I feel it for the family of the innocent soldier as they have to come to terms with what has happened - all the while seeing graphic images of his blood on the hands of one of the killers, splashed all over the papers, T.V, and social media.

But I also feel it for those members of our society who today will face accusing stares and whispers, as once again they bear the brunt of the actions of those who do not speak for them and are simply twisted psychopaths, using religion in a similar way to how Peter Sutcliffe defended his serial murder campaign against the prostitutes of Yorkshire, citing the (direct) word of God.  Both professed acts of religion, but only one dismissed as evil, psychotic, and not representing the true nature of that religion.

On a final note, I am so glad that my daughter cannot read social media this morning.  I wish for her to grow up caring about senseless tragedies, such as this.  I want for her to show empathy in understanding how utterly devastated the family of that poor man must be feeling.  But I don't want her exposed to intolerance, race hate and a vengeful society that turns on groups within through fear and anger and herd-mentality, encouraged by appallingly alarmist pieces written for the BBC and other news sources.

However, I fear that she will inevitably live in such a divided and intolerant society, but I hope that she has the strength of character and presence of mind to react with proportional calm, and not feel the destructive hatred that is burning within so many today.






6 comments:

  1. I think Lord Reid summed it up brilliantly when he said,

    "The dividing line is not between Islam and non-Islam. It is between the terrorists and everyone else."

    Just like certain American states refuse to teach evolution or the Westboro Baptist Church run the Godhatesfags website and picket gay peoples funerals, there are extremists in every religion OR ideology that are the lunatic fringe. The lunatics always find a way to out their mania :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely, Alex. Twisted lone wolf, not a soldier of Islam.

      It's just a shame that the extremist mania increasingly finds acceptance among otherwise good people.

      Delete
  2. Yes! I completely agree with what you have written. Like you say, there is no acknowledgement that Jihadism has no place in the genuine faith of Islam. Instead there is a horrible grouping together, labelling, whatever you want to call it of all Muslims and as with every time things like this happen, sensationalist coverage by the media that focuses on all the wrong aspects of such tradegy.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It was a terribly gruesome thing to have happened and I also hate the reaction.
    I also don't want my son growing up with this.
    Sad times.
    And the EDL getting involved takes more attention away from the victim and all serves to create more tensions and divides. NOT GOOD.
    Liska
    @NewMumOnline
    x

    ReplyDelete
  4. Totally agree. When does a terrorist become a terrorist? When he spouts some rubbish about Islam that puts everyone to shame. The way the bbc kept calling it a terrorist attack and playing on that terminology made me feel ashamed to be British!

    ReplyDelete
  5. That was a truly atrocious murder. I agree with your sentiments. It's more terroroists hiding behind their take on religion, it seems to me. It is not good, or correct, to assume allMuslims feel the same.

    xx Jazzy

    ReplyDelete

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